Home › SKY THE LIMIT AS HISTORIC EAST DOME PLACED AT SYDNEY OBSERVATORY

SKY THE LIMIT AS HISTORIC EAST DOME PLACED AT SYDNEY OBSERVATORY

Strengthening our local environment & communities , Minister for Ageing , Minister for Disability Services
John Ajaka on November 06, 2014

Deputy Premier and Minister for the Arts Troy Grant and Minister for Disability Services John Ajaka today watched on as a new dome was placed on Sydney Observatory at Millers Point which will now cater for people with disability.

Mr Grant said a hallmark of the Liberals & Nationals Government is its commitment to supporting vulnerable members of our society including people with disability.

“The purpose built building includes a lift to provide access into the dome and a specially designed telescope,” Mr Grant said.

“The NSW Government has provided $682,000 for this project which is being undertaken by the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences (Powerhouse Museum).

“The lifting of the east dome highlights the NSW Government’s ongoing commitment to breaking down barriers and making communities more inclusive,’’ Mr Grant said.

Mr Ajaka said the state-of-the-art telescope has an articulated relay eyepiece, sourced from the United States, which will make viewing the stars and planets of the night sky and other astronomical events easy for people with disability as the telescope is adjustable to different heights.

“The copper dome has been stored off site at Macquarie University for several years and its reinstatement today represents a significant milestone for the Observatory and its accessibility,” Mr Ajaka said.

“I pay tribute to the Sydney Observatory and Powerhouse Museum staff who worked hard to get the project finalised.

“Today’s milestone means we are one step closer to the opening of the third Observatory building which is scheduled for January.”

Rose Hiscock, Director, Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences said combining old with new had been a priority in the planning of the East Dome.

“The building is a welcome addition to the site, offering people with disability, their carers and even small children, the full magic of star gazing,” Ms Hiscock.

“Much consultation has gone into the selection of the new telescope and how it will operate with the mechanics of the old dome,” said Toner Stevenson, Manager Sydney Observatory.

“While we have provided an outdoor telescope experience for people with disabilities for years, there is really nothing like a dome experience.”

Sydney Observatory is Australia’s oldest and one of the most significant sites in the nation’s scientific history.